I’m really excited and honored to share that I’ll be reading this Friday evening at the Center for Book Arts in Manhattan with one of my favorite living authors and human beings, Douglas Kearney. A National Poetry Series winner, editor of the Best American Experimental Poetry anthology, and astoundingly intelligent shape-shifting/genre bending author whose performances animate the page incredibly, Douglas is a role model and aspirational figure for me. 

Curated by former Queens Poet Laureate Paolo Javier, the Center for Book Arts reading series pairs authors with outstanding visual artists to design event-specific, limited edition broadsides to commemorate the night. I’m thrilled that my poetry will be graphically represented in this way by visual artist Elizabeth Sheehan. 

Click here to RSVP

Here’s the formal announcement:

@ the CENTER FOR BOOK ARTS’ BROADSIDE SPRING READING SERIES

MAY 20th, 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

With Douglas Kearney & Sueyeun Juliette Lee

The Center’s Broadside Reading Series produces 12 limited-edition letterpress-printed broadsides each year, featuring the poetry of New York-based writers of diverse backgrounds. Our Spring 2016 series is organized by Guest Curator Paolo Javier. Poet laureate of Queens (2010-2014), Javier has published several collections of poetry, including Court of the Dragon (Nightboat Books), which Publisher’s Weekly calls “a linguistic time machine”.
Douglas Kearney has published three collections of poetry and teaches at CalArts. His third poetry collection, “Patter”, was a finalist for the California Book Awards in Poetry. A collection of his opera libretti, “Someone Took They Tongues.”, is available now.
Sueyeun Juliette Lee works for a women’s shelter in Denver and was a 2013 Pew Fellow in the Arts for Poetry. Her third collection, “Solar Maximum”, was published in 2015.
Suggested donation: $10 / $5 members
Guests receive a free letterpress broadside, produced by artists at the Center. 

The Center’s Literary Programs are supported, in part, by public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

The Center for Book Arts

28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor

New York, NY 10001
(212) 481-0295

http://centerforbookarts.org/

With immense gratitude to Laura Goldstein and Jen Karmin at the Red Rover Series for hosting me for what proved to be an incredible weekend, I’m amazed to say that my performance installation Blue Light and Wave was briefly reviewed by Art in America. 

The work would not have been possible without support from the Pew Foundation, Kunstnarhuset Messen in Norway, Counterpath Press and Gallery for rehearsal space, and Colorado Creative Industries for financing part of my appearance at the IN>TIME Performance Art Festival. 

I’m thinking, too, of my friend Bjørn Otto Wallevik who helped shoot video on site, Julia Cohen for hosting me in Chicago, and Jonathan Hamilton for videography support on a new project. 

I’m grateful and happy. Yay. 

I am so excited to share that I’ve been invited by the Red Rover Series to perform as a featured artist in Chicago’s city-wide performance arts festival, IN>TIME! I present on Friday, February 12th at 8pm.

I’ll be presenting a piece, titled “BLUE LIGHT and WAVE” that is dedicated to the deep blue twilight of the sub-arctic. Here’s the write up for it:


 

 

11026222_10155310743375644_2364708229029028911_n

BLUE LIGHT and WAVE    (video projection, installation, and performance; approx. 20 mins)

Red Rover Series at Outer Space Studio
1474 N. Milwaukee Ave
February 12th and 13th, at 8pm
suggested donation $4

Dedicated to the deep blue of arctic twilight, BLUE LIGHT and WAVE meditates on human fragility, memory, and longing. Centered on the premise that light is a language, BLUE LIGHT and WAVE engages the subtle light of twilight–the sun’s intensity is softened as the earth turns away from its direct shine; shorter blue wavelengths dominate the landscape, allowing distant starlight to permeate our gaze.

In the realm of this softened blue light, our bodies are perhaps most open to receiving the subtle messages that have traversed unimaginable distances to descend into us. Under such a sky, can we speak with the stars, to the gentled sun? What stories do we seek to communicate back into the heavens?

Video elements were shot in the subarctic environment of wintry Norway, capturing the twilight’s fall into deep blue. The installation collects together materials from the region that were “charged” with this blue light; the hope is that they will transmit these wavelengths resonantly into the audience’s bodies. The performance poaches elements from the Korean traditional dance form of the salp’uri–a shamanic dance for discharging grief and hardship. A meditative solo dance, the salp’uri form features a long white sash that helps the dancer communicate these emotions into the atmosphere.

An intimate experience, BLUE LIGHT and WAVE invites up to 20 individuals to wander through the installation and observe a twenty minute ritualistic recitation and performance.

If grief is a deep blue set loose in our bodies, can it find rest under a twilight sky?

I have a new poem up at The Fanzine! It’s called “The Thaw” and is dedicated to my explorations in the sub-arctic, and it ruminates over the essential “blue print” of life. When I was in that blue light, I couldn’t help but feel that I was connecting with something deeply ancestral–not just on a human scale, but ancestral to all of life’s basic energies. It was a beautiful, solitary, contemplative time up there.